Food Fit Philly

 

Philly Food Bucks and Farmers’ Markets:

Hunting Park Revitalization Project


The new Hunting Park Farmers’ Market is a great example of how the health of the community can be improved by making healthy food more accessible, while supporting local farmers.

In June 2011, the Hunting Park Farmers’ Market was one of ten new markets established to improve the availability of fresh, nutritious and affordable foods in low-income
communities. This market was particularly special because it was part of a larger neighborhood revitalization effort to renew the 87-acre park into a safe, accessible meeting space for the community.

Before the Hunting Park market was established, the neighborhood had very poor access to healthy foods. Now, with the presence of the market, residents can enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables in the neighborhood.  Healthy food is not only easy to find, but also affordable for residents.  Similar to other Food Trust markets, the Hunting Park market accepts several food assistance programs like ACCESS cards/food stamps, Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (FMNP) vouchers and Philly Food Bucks.

Products for the Hunting Park Farmers’ Market come from local farmer Emanuel Stoltzfus of Mount Pleasant Organics. He provides a wide variety of produce and other products on a weekly basis from June to November.

For a complete list of farmers’ markets in Philadelphia, visit www.foodfitphilly.org/eat-healthy-near-you/farmers-markets/.

 

 

Healthy Corner Stores: How healthy food is good for business


Since 2010, the Healthy Corner Store Network (HCSN) has grown to over 600 corner stores – the largest in the nation.  The Healthy Corner Store network is made possible through a partnership with The Food Trust that works with corner stores in Philadelphia to help them increase awareness and availability of health foods in neighborhoods across the city.

Guillermo Rodriquez, owner of Weso Mini Market in North Philadelphia joined HCSN in June 2010. Since then, he has added incredible amounts of healthy products to his inventory such as fresh and canned fruits and vegetables, 100% juice, low-fat dairy and whole grains. As part of the HCSN, his store received a refrigerator, produce rack and table to stock the healthy food products. To show his commitment to provide healthy food options, Guillermo removed two shelves of junk food in order to make space for healthy foods in the front of the store. He has kept the prices of the produce competitive to the prices of unhealthy food, and has reported that people in the neighborhood frequently purchase produce.

Visit  http://www.foodfitphilly.org/eat-healthy-near-you/healthy-corner-stores/ to learn more or to find a healthy corner store near you.


Get Healthy Philly is a project of the Philadelphia Department of Public Health and is made possible, in part, by funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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